New Jersey car insurance

A little bit of knowledge goes a long way when it comes to New Jersey car insurance. There’s no need to go in-depth, just learn enough to be able to evaluate the comparisons you will be doing on this site.  We make it super-easy.

 

Top among the important things you need to know is what impacts your rate, so you can do whatever you can to reduce it.  Chief among these is your driving record, which is analyzed to determine how likely it is you’ll have an accident.  If you have had few accidents and moving violations, you will see that reflected in a lower rate than someone whose record is tarnished. Bottom line: keep points off your license.

 

Where you live and car insurance

Geography is also important, in terms of where you live. If you are in a high-theft area, you’ll see that in your rate. Urban high-traffic areas are also more risky.

 

Your demographic factors are also calculated in. Older drivers have more experience and are lower risks, until they become seniors and their risk goes up. Teens are always a riskier group, since they are responsible for a larger percentage of accidents.  Males are more apt to get in accidents than females, so you will always see a difference there.  If you are married, you are less apt to be in a wreck and will see lower rates.

 

Your prior claims history is an important factor, as is your insurance history. It is a good idea to not show a gap in insurance coverage, as that works against you.  The model and make of your car counts in several different ways. If your car is on the most-frequently-stolen list, expect higher premiums. If it is a newer model that did well in crash tests, you will see that in your rates.  If you have a special, classic car, you may have to pay more.

 

Car insurance discounts and vehicle use

How is your vehicle used? If you drive it to work every day through traffic, you may see higher rates. If you drive it only on weekends you may find lower rates.

 

Every company has a formula by which they view potential customers. The formula calculates one thing: risk. But as you can see, there are many factors influencing risk. Some of them are within your control and if you can possibly improve your risk profile by changing your them, it’s smart to do so.